Fush And Clicks

A Blog On All Things Digital (And Not).

Google Maps App Won’t be Found on iPhones Anytime Soon

Apple Maps IOS 6

Bad news for iPhone users. Google has revealed that it won’t be bringing Google Maps back to IOS anytime soon.

Apple launched its own Maps application last week, a move that was met by widespread derision for its inaccurate locations and directions, as well as its lack of public transport information.

It also seems like iPhone and iPad users will be left struggling with Apple’s Maps app, as Google has said it has no plans to bring Google Maps back to IOS. We can’t help but think this is a good move on Google’s part, as it might draw some users away from IOS to its Google Maps equipped Android operating system.

Google’s executive chairman Eric Schmidt announced the bad news, telling Reuters that the firm “hasn’t done anything yet” with regards to developing a Google Maps app for IOS 6.

“We think it would have been better if they had kept ours. But what do I know?” Schmidt added. “What were we going to do, force them not to change their mind? It’s their call.”

All hope isn’t lost, however. Here’s a guide on how to get Google Maps back on your iPhone, courtesy of our sister site, The Inquirer.

What’s more, Schmidt said that he hopes Google will remain Apple’s search partner on the iPhone, but he didn’t sound too optimistic that this will happen.

“I’m not doing any predictions. We want them to be our partner. We welcome that. I’m not going to speculate at all what they’re going to do. They can answer that question as they see fit,” he said.

Also on the subject of search partners, according to Forbes, Schmidt said Google would be “interested in working with Yahoo US. He also said nothing doing for the time being, but they would be interested. It was also mentioned to him that there is new management at Yahoo US with a Google connection [Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer]. But he played it pretty straight…. He also said they had expressed this interest to Yahoo before on a number of occasions.”

Originally posted on Search Engine Watch

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Google AdWords Enhanced Sitelinks Rolling Out Globally: How to Set Them Up

 

Originally posted on Search Engine Watch

enhanced-adwords-sitelinks

Google has announced that sitelinks on desktop search ads, first introduced in February this year, are now rolling out to users in all countries where AdWords is available.

The sitelinks extension allows advertisers to show links to various pages within the website below their ad text. In early testing, Google claimed ads with sitelinks saw an average of 30 percent higher CTRs.

Advertisers can create up to ten sitelinks when selecting campaign settings, from the Ad extensions tab. There is a checkbox in the settings to activate the feature, which says, “Sitelinks: Extend my ads with links to sections of my site.”

extend-sitelinks-box

Ads may show two, four, or six sitelinks in addition to the site URL. Ads displayed on mobile phones can show up to two sitelinks, maximum.

Each link should have a unique landing page and there should be one ad to match each sitelink, at a “bare minimum,” according to Google.

Advertisers must delete the “http” when entering page URLs in order for the sitelinks to work. The order in which links are entered does factor into how often a sitelink will appear in an ad.

sitelinks-enter-links

Google recommends keeping sitelink text “short and sweet,” to increase the amount of links they can show in each ad.

Enhanced sitelinks will only show in ads above the top organic search results, not in the sidebar. Advertisers struggling to reach the top ad position can try to improve their Quality Score or increase their max bid to increase the likelihood their enhanced sitelinks will appear.

In the announcement, Senior AdWords Engineer Pramod Adiddam warns, “Like other forms of sitelinks, enhanced sitelinks are generated automatically so they might vary in appearance. And you might not see them show 100% of the time even when you’re eligible.”

Are you using enhanced sitelinks in your campaigns? Let us know what experience you’ve had with them!

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Google Search Results: From 10 To 7 To 4?

Originally posted on Search Engine Roundtable. 

A couple weeks ago, we reported Google is showing only seven search results when the search query is specific enough to warrant less results.

To my surprise, it seems like Google is cutting that number to only show four search results!

Yes, a WebmasterWorld thread has one searcher noticing for search results that return sitelinks, instead of showing seven results, it is now showing only four results.

This seems to be a test, I cannot replicate the test myself but the screen captures seem legit.

four Google results

As you can see, Google took this down from ten, which came down from seven and now is only showing four results.

I am not sure if Google has serious intentions of only showing four search results on a page or not, but they seem to be testing it.

The WebmasterWorld thread has one more picture as well.

Forum discussion at WebmasterWorld.

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Google TV Ads Cancelled

Following a four-year effort in the incredibly lucrative TV ad business, Google has decided to pull the plug. Traditional TV ads are out – going forward Google plans to focus exclusively on digital.

Google has now tried and failed to disrupt the traditional advertising business in print, radio and television. In part, Google’s TV effort was slow to attract new advertisers and more partners to the platform.

“Video is increasingly going digital and users are now watching across numerous devices. So we’ve made the hard decision to close our TV Ads product over the next few months,” Shishir Mehrotra, VP of product at YouTube and video at Google, wrote in a blog post. “We’ll be doubling down on video solutions for our clients (like YouTube, AdWords for Video, and ad serving tools for web video publishers). We also see opportunities to help users access web content on their TV screens, through products like Google TV.”

“The [satellite] and cable operators have excess unsold inventory so it was partially an experiment,” said Derek Baine, senior analyst at SNL Kagan. But Google had a much bigger target than just TV ad sales – it wanted to compete with Nielsen on ratings.

Google tried to convince cable and satellite operators to license their set-top box data so it could compete with Nielsen, he said.

“They were just begging to get more data in the database. In the long run that would be a lot more valuable company than one just selling ad inventory. So I think it is a bigger deal.”

While smaller TV networks were more open to giving Google a shot, most continued to rely on Nielsen as the gold standard.

“Nielsen’s got a stranglehold on the industry, there’s no question about that,” said Baine. “It seems like there’s got to be a change. All of the set-top box data exists. It’s out there, it’s just going to take an intermediary to get in there and aggregate it.”

Google’s TV ad business showed early promise with a significant inventory commitment from NBC Universal, but once it pulled out of the fledgling network in 2010 it never regained its footing. Google landed a new deal with Cox Media earlier this year, and kicked off 2012 with a client roster that also included DIRECTVVerizon FiOS and Viamedia.

Over the course of 2011, Google reported a six-fold increase in the number of ads aired per day and said it tripled its reach across cable and satellite operators. Despite that growth, Google was still looking back on a markedly turbulent effort. The company’s best years in TV ad sales had come and gone. Google’s network reaches 42 million households today, but in 2009 it could reach up to 12 million more households.

One problem for Google was trying to convince big media companies not to be paranoid of its efforts.

“People are obviously paranoid of Google because they’ve become so big and dominant,” said Baine. “Cable and satellite operators do not want Google in their set-top boxes.”

Of course that’s an especially unique situation for Google today now that it owns its own set-top business through its Motorola Mobility acquisition. Just one day before it bowed out of the TV ads business, Bloomberg reported that Google was moving forward with plans to sell Motorola’s set-top business.

This post originally appeared on ClickZ.

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